Contributed and earned (program) revenue are the two financing streams with the greatest impact on operations, so they typically are of most interest to arts researchers and managers. But an arts nonprofit’s total revenue may also have elements from investments, membership dues, rents, unrelated businesses, and perhaps other sources. Because of financial reporting regulations, revenues include not only the investment income stream from reserves and endowments, but also the changes in the values of those investments.

In the Local Arts Index, we did not analyze those other areas in detail; focusing instead on program and contributed revenues, which have the greatest impact on operations. By contrast, this indicator simply looks at total revenue brought in by local arts organizations from all sources, so it incorporates all of these other revenue streams.

The indicator is calculated by taking 2012 total revenues for arts nonprofits in each county, divided by its 2012 population. For any given county, average per capita revenue from these other sources (besides earned and contributed) can be estimated by subtracting the sum of program revenue and contributed revenue from this total.

Data for this indicator are from the 2012 Core Files at the National Center for Charitable Statistics.

Additional Information: Counties with indicator value = 2,511. Average county indicator value = $68.20. Median county indicator value = $20.26.

 

Fast Facts from the Arts Index

Demand for arts in education by college-bound students is up!

According to data published by The College Board, the share of SAT test-takers with 4 years of arts or music classes in high school has grown over the past decade from 15% to 20%. The number of college arts degrees conferred annually have risen steadily from 75,000 to 129,000 over the past dozen years.